“Name that Sound” easy auditory discrimination and memory activity for music therapy and education by Margie La Bella of Music Therapy Tunes.

This is great! So easy and so useful!  I got some great cloth bags from BearPawCreek and used them to store instruments.  But I had one or two extra.  I put all my instruments into a bin and used the bag to scoop one up without the children being able to see what I was doing. Then, I played the instrument with my hands inside the bag and asked the kids to tell me what they heard.  We repeated the game for several common rhythm instruments and the class loved it!  We then followed up with a group instrumental song.

Good for the following skills: auditory discrimination, auditory memory, expressive language, attention span and focus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This has been a blog by Margie La Bella of Music Therapy Tunes on the use of alternate

adaptive notation systems for children, adolescents, and adults who contend with

autism, add, adhd, down’s syndrome, down syndrome, ptsd, trauma, psychiatric issues,  learning disabilities, ld, cp, and all the rest of us. Thank you for reading.

 

 

 

How to play a song by Ear aka: How to figure out the Chords by Margie La Bella of Music Therapy Tunes

ON PLAYING BY “EAR”

This is a topic I’ve been very curious about and I’d love feedback from both trained and self-taught musicians, schooled, unschooled, classical, improv, other-taught etc

First of all, some people just have the “knack.” I started out on the clarinet at age 9 and played by ear two weeks later and was hooked.  Playing by sight is less natural and sometimes painful to me. People who can fluently do both may have it made in the shade.

Here are a few analogies that happen in my brain. I’d love to hear about yours. (No pun.)

 

In one way, it’s like walking. If I go into the spare bedroom, it’s a short walk and must be and is that way. The TV set is just further and to go there I have to cross a wide gap, but not as far as the garage.  It’s about mental placement.  Or it’s like sorting mail. The “A” letters go in this top pile because they just do.  The “Ms” go in the middle and they must. The “Qs” go a little further down the line.  Things have their place and they just must go there.  Spoons don’t go in the fork compartment.  Enough with that analogy.

 

Here’s how I approached picking out a chord progression from the radio before I took music theory.  Most songs just have patterns of chords. If a C goes to an F then a Dm, then there will probably be places where the same sequence of chords appears later in the song – –  Often over and over.  I guess my ear tried to pick out the bass notes and then used  the related chords (either major or minor); whichever the song sounded like. The Bass note is key here. The little bass decorative bass note runs are not in this mix. The louder, longer, more on (or nearest) the beat are the ones I’m talking about here. The bass line often plays the name of the chord.  A “G” chord will have a G bass note and so on.

 

After taking music theory and learning about I, IV,Vs and other chord progressions numerically, I saw the greater system.  This explained why Cs,F, and Gs were often together in songs just like As,Es, and Ds.  Most songs on the radio follow a 1,4,5,1 progression.  vi, VI, IV is also popular. Now, there are lots of  IV,V, vi,V in popular songs.

 

I’ll try to write about all those numbers later on.  But I don’t think in terms of numbers when listening to a song I want to figure out. I listen to the bass line. The introduction itself is like a little microcosm of the whole song. It usually contains both the majority of chords in the song and how they are strung together.

Once you have the intro figured out, most of the song will  be those very chords played over and over – or at least the chorus. Then you will have the sequence of verse-chords which stay pretty much the same from verse to verse.  Songs often have a “bridge” portion; that interest piquing different part after two verses that brings you back home to your beloved chorus.  Those chords may be different from the chorus or verses.

 

I sing along with the bass line then take it to the guitar or piano.   Those notes are usually played over and over and they often carry the (name of the ) chord. And that is your song.

Internet site song chords are often correct for the most part, but some leave a bit to be desired.  Try singing the bass notes to see if the chords are on the correct words and are based(!) on the correct note.  Fiddle around with some different related chords and that may bring the song to life for you.  Try using a chord from further on down the song.

 

[Shoot; that’s a whole other topic. How do you know when to even switch the chords if they are poorly placed on the screen? The new chord is often on the first beat of the measure or on the emphasized or longest word. Sometimes at the beginning of the sentence. On the word that the sound becomes different or moves. My ears just hear it. The color of the picture changes. Suddenly, there is a new shape, or texture.  One is a glass, one is a plate. Things just shift. How would YOU describe this?? Margie is curious! ]

If I’m really stumped by a chord I just find the bass note and play around with any chord containing that note.

I’d really like to hear how you all figure out melodies and chords. How do you get the job done??  What mental pictures can you sort of use to help explain your method?  Do you prefer reading or playing by ear?  And what do you use your music for/ to accomplish?

What’s your end result??  What technique do you use to improve your skills? And all that Jazz??  :)

 

 

 

Submitted by Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes. com.

How to play songs by ear, playing by ear for musicians and “non-musicians” and is there such a thing, really…..

“It’s Thanksgiving” viral song for older kids gr8 for music therapy / education by Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes

-Age: 6-12 (+ or – depending on population,)
-Goal Area: Expressive language skills, discussion of Thanksgiving, Families, What really happens during the holidays, feelings, socialization, etc….
-Name of Activity: It’s Thanksgiving by Nicole Westbrook,
-Objective: Kids will sing the words, and/or discuss the holidays.
-Materials: Song
-Method: Sing and/or discuss
-Adaptations: Rewrite the lyrics, draw a Thanksgiving scene from their lives, talk about gratitude and/or wishes, make your own video of the song components, play the chords of the song, record it with the kids, give each child/group an instrument sounding one of the four chords in this song and play it as a group.   What can you think of? 
-Submitted by: Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes.
Here’s is my home made video of the song lyrics and chords. 
 
This song is very repetitive and predictable and a bit monotonous – BUT it’s cheery and the words are positive. This all makes for a great song choice for my particular kids who have difficulties with language.  The teachers get into the pop feel of this, too.  
 
http://youtu.be/NGPxnYVjnD0
 
Chords by MusicTherapyTunes.com
A……………D ……….F#m……………E
Oh oh oh. Oh oh oh. Oh oh oh. Oh yeah.
A……………D ………F#m…………….E
Oh oh oh. Oh oh oh. Alright. Come on
 
.A……….. ………..D ……………………..F#m……………. E
I’m wide awake. And I should take. A step and say thank you, thank you.

 

A………………….D …………………..F#m……………. E
The things you’ve done. And what you did. Oh yeah. Uuu, yeah.

 

——————————————————————————————A………………….. D…………….F#m…………..A/E……….A…………. D
December was Christmas. January was New Year. April was Easter.
 ………….F#m………….. E
 And the 4th of July, but now it’s Thanksgiving.

 

————————————————————————————————
A…………………….. D ……..F#m………………….. E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. We we we we are gonna have a good time.
A……………………..D ……….F#m………………… E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. We we we are gonna have a good time.

 

A………………………….D …………………F#m…………………… E
With a turkey, eh mash potatoes eh, and we..we we are gonna have a good time.
A……………………..D …………………….F#m………………… E
With a turkey, eh mash potatoes eh,  It’s Thanksgiving.  It’s Thanksgiving. (alright)

 

————————————————————————————————-
A………….. D …………F#m……………….E
School is out, I can shout, thank you, thank you, thank you.
A…………………………D ………………………..F#m… E
No matter how you do, no matter what you say, this is my favorite.
 
A…………… D…………….F#m…………..A/E……….A…………. D
December was Christmas. January was New Year. April was Easter.
 ………….F#m…………….. E
 And the 4th of July, but now it’s Thanksgiving.
A…………………..D …….F#m…………………………. E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. We we we we are gonna have a good time.

 

A……………………….D ………………..F#m…………………….. E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. (alright) We we we are gonna have a good time.
———————————————————————————————————

 

A………………………………………………………..D
Yo. It’s Thanksgiving giving giving and I’m trying to be forgiving. (come on girl)
…F#m…………………………… E
Nothing is forbidden. You know we I gotta have.
A……………………………
I gotta give thanks to you, and you, and you.
D……
Can’t be hateful, gotta be grateful.
.F#m
Gotta be grateful, can’t be hateful.
E
Mash potatoes on my – on my table.

 

A………………………D
I got ribs smelling up my neighbor’s cribs. (alright)
…….F#m…………………………………………..E
Can’t deny  Havin’ good times  We’d be laughing till we cry
A…………………………………………….D
It’s Thanks Thanks Thanks Thanksgiving
………………….A………………………………………..D
Come on It’s Thanks Thanks Thanks Thanksgiving. Give em Thanksgiving Yo! 

 

——————————————————————————————————

A…………………………D …….F#m………………….. E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. We we we we are gonna have a good time.
A………………………..D ………………..F#m…………….. E
Oh oh oh it’s Thanksgiving. (alright) We we we are gonna have a good time.
A………………………………D ……………………F#m………………… E
With a turkey, eh mash potatoes eh, and we we we are gonna have a good time.
A……………………………….D …………………..F#m……………….. E
With a turkey, eh mash potatoes eh! It’s Thanksgiving.  It’s Thanksgiving

“Drum Circle Game” and 3 variations: a music therapy activity idea for preschoolers, children, adolescents and adults

-Age:

-Goal Area: socialization, creativity, interaction, cooperation and impulse control.

-Objective: Drum holders will remain in their proper place and make their drums accessible to the player.  The drummer will go around to their choice of drums and create a drum solo or drum accompaniment.

-Materials: Shape drums (or other drums) and sticks as needed. Optional place markers for people to stand on.  Chairs may also be used if needed.

-Method: Drum holders are to stand in a circle, holding their drums out in front of them.  Therapist begins to play a supporting song to facilitate the group’s goals- be it on another drum, piano, or guitar.  The drummer then plays a solo or accompanying drum line on any and all of the drums in front of him or her.

-Adaptations: !) Place markers or chairs may be used, if needed, to define the appropriate area to situate drum holders.  2) Drum holders may move their drums slowly to the song and the drummer has to really watch and move to play along.  3) Also holders may walk in a slow sideways step in a circle around the drummer, who has to keep up with them in order to make his/her music. 4) I do this with groups of up to 12 children with only 6 drums. We make this work for us by having half the group do the activity as above and half the group dance to the music and “freeze” when we stop to change drummers.   Let me know what you can think of!

-Submitted by: Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes, thanks to Jamie.

Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

“St. Patrick’s Day Group Dance” a great music therapy idea for all ages

Just letting you know that I have a great video of a standing or seated Saint Patrick’s Day dance taught on this video. The song is SIAMSA from The Lord of the Dance. This should be written up under activities for adults.  Change the words to reflect the needs of the group.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijNW-gd0SU4

 

 

Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

Margie’s preliminary collection of music therapy activity ideas

http://musictherapytunes.com/AAA/Lesson%20plans%20for%20site%20August%202011gillbold9%20pt%20font.pdf   You may have to select this link,  right click and then press go to…..

“Old School Fill in the blanks Rap Song” music therapy activity for kids and adolescents

Here’s an old rap that I found in the back of the vaults of time. It’s old school but can certainly be used.  The therapist and/or the group can keep the beat (tap tap TAP) while the soloist reads, or a chosen friend or teacher raps the rhyme.  Add in solos and a group discussion. Of course kids can add their own words, within the confines of the facility/groups rules. This sort of thing should be addressed beforehand with the therapy team and administrators. The result can be recorded or the process videoed. Goals can include starting out with a new group, getting to know each other, cohesion and cooperation, academic skills, and more…..

 ______________, __________is my name.

Me and  ___________ are one and the same.
I like ___________it’s my favorite game.
I don’t like ___________it’s not the same.

 

__________________give me a head-ache.
Don’t want to ___________for goodnes sake.
I’d rather_________with my free time.
__________________feels just fine.

 

I like to _______when I’m mad.
But ________makes me sad.
_____spooks me.
_______oooks me.
And when I ________I feel glad.

 

I have ____people in my family.
There’s ___and then there’s me.
Everybody give me a cheer.
I did _______and I’m outta here. 
 
 
Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes
 

“Pop songs w appropriate Lyrics” music therapy songs for adolescents / teens

These are good pop songs with appropriate lyrics. Give a listen and make sure they will work for your particular goals,  facility and group/individual.
1)Kick, Push(2006), Lupe Fiasco”Welcome Back” – Mase “Switch” – Will Smith
2)Kiss Kiss(2007), Chris brown. “The Way I Are” – Timbaland  “Come To Me” – Diddy
3)You Make Me Better(2007), Fabolous.  “Freshazimiz” – Bow Wow
4)Whip My Hair (2010), Willow Smith. Sung by Will Smith’s daughter!
5)Good Morning(2009), Chamillionaire “Kiss Kiss” – Chris Brown feat. T-Pain
“Dangerous” -Ying Yang Twins feat Wycle  “Sweetest Girl” – Wyclef, Akon, Lil Wayne  “I Got It From My Mama” –
 Will.I.Am  “Let’s Get Retarded or (it started)” – Black Eyed Peas “I Want You” – Common
“Seed 2.0” – The Roots “Quality Control” – Jurassic 5  “The Way You Move” – Outkast
“Feel Good Inc.” – Gorillaz “Control Myself” – LL Cool J feat J-Lo  “Money Maker” – Ludacris “You Make Me Better” – Fabolous feat Ne-Yo  “Lose Control” – Missy Elliot  “The Good Life” -Kanye West “Blow Ya Mind” – Eve feat Gwen Stefani  “Kick, Push” – Lupe Fiasco
“She Wants To Move” – N.E.R.D. “Dilemma” – Nelly feat Kelly Rowland
1)”Unwritten” by Natasha Bedingfield 2)”Video” by India.Arie 3) “You Gotta Be” by Des’ree
4)”Fifteen”by Taylor Swift 5)”Gone”by Switchfoot  ” Who I am”


So many thanks to :michellerjs@gmail.com  Website:beyondthemusicmt.blogspot.com

Twitter: beyondthemusic facebook fan page: Beyond the Music: a resource for MT/MT interns

 

Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

“City Sounds” music therapy sound poem for children,adolescents, and adults

-Age:  6 to 12 and up
-Goal: Cooperation, group contribution and participation.
-Name of Activity: Silence  (a sound poem)
– Materials: Instruments to represent the different objects in the poem.
-Method: The group creates background music/ sound effects  after each line of the poem is read.
-Adaptations: Have the group read it emphasizing the last word of each sentence in a way that relates to that word.  Certainly, you can create your own image and sound poem.  Compose free form background music for the poem.  Listen to different compositions and select the best one for the poem.
-Source: Eve Merriam – The inner city mother goose
-Submitted by:  Margie@musictherapytunes.com
 
Hark, Hark the dogs do bark.  The neighbors yell. The babies cry. The busses grind.
The bongs bong. The telephones ring. The jet plans fly. The car horns honk
The taxis screech. The radio’s on. The TV’s high.
The rock and roll pours from the CD stores.
The subway roars. The old women mutter in the gutter.
The rats squeak. The flies buzz. Only the roaches quietly crawl.

 

 Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

“Another Native American Sound Poem” for music therapy with children, adolescents, and adults

-Age: 6 to 12 and up
-Goal: Cooperation
-Name of Activity: Native American Sound Poem (Works well with Thanksgiving)
-Materials: poem,  guiro, bells, clatterpillar, drum, sand blocks.
-Method:  Speaker reads the poem, instrumentalists play their instruments at the specified time.  Jam up a melody for it.
-Namely, after each sentence.  
-Submitted by: Margie@musictherapytunes.com
-Source: Carol Bitcom
-Instrumentation: Moccasins-guirro, bells, fire-clatterpillar, drums, brushes-sandblocks
 
Words:  Get your….
Moccasins creeping.   Ankle  bells ringing.  Fire spitting.  Drums beating. Brushes swishing.
Here We have a tale to tell.
Moccasins creeping. Bells ringing. Fire spitting. Drums beating . Brushes swishing
What will happen?   None of Us know. 
 
 
Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes