Fun Birthday Song for children’s or elderly Music Therapy Group by Margie La Bella of Music Therapy Tunes

This was a spontaneous, group song that happened during a group instrumental “jam.”

The teacher called out “It’s Luke’s Birthday today” while we were playing “Skinamarink” for Valentine’s day.

We suddenly joined in (WITH Luke’s permission!!) a verse of a birthday version of the old standard.  It went like this:

G

Skinamarinky dinky dink. Skinarmarinky duke.

G………….. Am

We love Luke.   (Rhyme likewise for other people’s names.)

Am…………….. D7……………. Am……………….. D7

Skinamarinky dinky dink. Skinarmarinky duke.

AmD7….G…G7

We love Luke.

G……………………………………………….G7

We love you in the morning and in the afternoon.

C………………………………….A7………………….D7

Happy happy birthday underneath the moon!

G…………………………………………………………E7

Skinamarinky dinky dink. Skinarmarinky duke.

A7…D7….G

We love Luke.

 

 

 

“Halloween Echo Song” for older kids. Short sentences. Good for Music therapy activities. By Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes

Goal Area: Turn taking, or group singing via expressive language Objective: Kids share the microphone and moment in the spotlight.
Materials: Mic and song
Method:  Sing a phrase in the mic, hold mic to child and have child repeat.
Adaptations:
1. I use this song as an echo song. Rather than repeat the last word of each phrase 3x, we repeat the whole phrase.   Shy children might just say “pass” or sing in a spooky voice. I don’t have trouble getting my kids to sing, but I never make a child sing solo. The alternative voice may be a little less stressful to some children. I also put little effects on the mic, such as echo, reverb, or chorus, to make a shy child’s effort more rewarding and less “intimate.”
2. You can have the children repeat the last word after you. But beware in both instances that you do not want to reinforce echolalia!!  You can talk about the song and Halloween costumes and safety afterwards and ask the children questions to stimulate real language.
3. This makes a cute performance piece.
4. Make up your own verses about the children’s fave Halloween characters.

 Source: “His Name was Jack” by Billy Grisack

Melody: Miss Mary Mack

 ……………E

His name is Jack, Jack, Jack.

 

………………….B7
His eyes were black, black, black.

 

………………B7
His face was orange, orange, orange.

 

……………….E
And that’s a fact, fact, fact.

 

Inside his head, head, head.
a flame was red, red, red.
and in the dark, dark, dark.
the children said, said, said:

 

“Trick or treat, treat, treat.,”
along the street, street, street.
They knocked on doors ……(continue to repeat twice as above.)
for something sweet…

 

to charm the hosts….
they dressed a ghosts,
monsters and ghouls….
to get the most….

 

All through the night….
under this sight….
he sat and watched….
still glowing bright\….

 

And that’s a fact, fact, fact.
His eyes were black….
His face was orange…
His name was Jack….

“It’s a Halloween Party” song for music therapy / education students by Margie La Bella of Music therapy Tunes.

Goal Area: Expressive language, attention span,
Objective: Kids will sing the various sounds associated with the  Halloween characters.
Materials: song, kids, pictures of the characters.
Method: Sing and encourage the children to do likewise.
Adaptations: 1. Sing each verse as its own entity. 2. For a trickier version, after the last phrase of each verse, string the preceding verses. Other examples of this backwards chaining activity are “The twelve days of Christmas” and “Father Abraham.”  3. Also, assign (or let the children pick) instruments to represent the characters. Use a microphone to inspire participation. 4. Older kids can make the sounds in a microphone as the lyrics indicate. This requires quick responding and attention span. Try it! 5. Make your own Halloween verses with related sound effects.
Source: “Come on Everybody, it’s a Halloween Party” by Frank Leto.
Lyrics,chords,

 

You can hear a verse of this song at …http://www.amazon.com/Come-Everybody-Its-Halloween-Party/dp/B003HJFI2Q
………..D…………..G……………..D
1.Come on let me hear the witches laugh (hee, hee.)
………………………G………………A
Come on let me hear the witches laugh (hee, hee.)
……….D………..D/C……..G…………….Gm
Come on everybody it’s a Halloween party
……..D…………..G………A…………D
Come on let me hear the witches laugh (hee, hee.)

 

2.Come on let me hear the cat’s meow. (Meow, meow.)
Come on let me hear the cat’s meow.
Come on everybody it’s a Halloween party.
Come on let me hear the cat’s meow. And the witches laugh.

 

3.Come on let me hear the Bat’s flying(flap, flap)  Note: we say squeak, squeak.
and the cat’s meow…
and the witches laugh…
(A MT would really want to fix the misplaced syllable!!)

 

4. Come on let me hear the spooky ghost  (whoooo)

 

5. Come on let me hear the little elf  (boo-hoo.)

 

6.Come on let me hear the trick or treaters. (Trick of Treat!)

“Spiders cookin’ in the Pan” a Halloween Poem and activity for music therapy and music education by Margie La Bella of Music Therapy Tunes

 
I love it when the kids themselves help create a new activity.
Benefits: stimulates attention, participation, movement, expressive language, number concepts and more
This rhyme was originally written up as the following: http://www.musictherapytunes.com/wp/?p=1456

 1 little spider cookin’ in the pan.

He went Pop and he went Bam!

 2 little spiders cookin’ in the pan.

One went Pop and the other went Bam!

 3 little spiders cookin in the pan.

One went Pop and the others went Bam! etcetera
 
Method: Ask the children to imagine that the tambourine/framedrum/lollipop drum is a frying pan.  Then drop one spider into the pan and chant the rhyme.  Encourage children to say the rhyme, especially the words “pop” and “bam.” On the word “bam” tap the bottom of the drum hard enough to send the spider flying. This should really elicit some good attention. Ask a child to go find the spider and describe where it is. This is good for language concepts such as “over,” “under,” “next to” and more.  Add a spider to the pan and have the class count the spiders.  Repeat witrh 2,3,4 spiders and more. 

 Variations: Have the kids think of other creatures. Then hold a large frame drum over their heads. Kids jump up and create a thump on the drum using their heads. It may or may not be in your job’s best interest to do this activity, but again, the kids all love it.  Use with discretion as to who you play this variation with. Don’t forget – the thump is 100% created by the child.

 

Follow up with “There’s a spider on my head, on my head”…..  (Happy and you know it.)

 

 

Pop Pop fourth (4th) of July song for kids with a bonus chant

Goal: to improve auditory memory, language skills, oral-motor skills, sequencing skills, number concepts, fine motor skills
Materials: could include glow in the dark strips, and 5 pictures of different fireworks
Method: Show the children the 5 picutres of fireworks, count them slowly and tell the group to raise 5 fingers, Count them. Then sing the rhyme with the children adding in the motor component (tap and clap rhythms.) After the children are familiar with the chant, leave out the words “bang” and “pop” and have the children fill in the blank.
You can even have the children be the fireworks by lining them up and asking them to jump with the words “bang” and “pop,” Another variation is to have them play one instrument for those words, for example bang would be the cymbol and pop would be the drum.
This chant is a variation of the little chant:
5 little sausages cookin’ in the pan. One went pop and the other went bam. And so forth with 4,3,2, and 1.
4th of july rhyme. Dress this up for “older” kids by making all kinds of rhythmic variations on the bang/pop verse. If your kids giggle at the word bang, change it to pow or boom.
Examples of the variations include: bang bang bang pop rest (ta ta ta rest), or bang bang bang pop pop (ti ti ta ta ta) This turns it into an auditory memory drill.
5 little firecrackers shooting/flying to the top.
One went bang and the other went pop.
bang bang (tap knees) Pop pop pop (clap hands 3x)
repeat the above line three more times. (ta ta titi ta)   or last time: Noisy, noisy make it stop!!
4 little firecrackers shooting/flying to the top.

One went bang and the other went pop.
bang bang bang pop pop pop (titi ta, titi ta)
3 little firecrackers shooting/flying to the top.
One went bang and the other went pop.
bang bang bang pop pop  (titi tah, ta ta)
Here’s a bonus song:
Fireworks go snap,snap,snap!                               
c-r-r-r-rcrack!  Zap,zap,zap!
Fireworks make me clap,clap,clap
On Independence Day!
—  —  —  —  —  —
I was Born in the USA! Born in the USA!
I Was Born in the USA! And it is Independence Day!
 
Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes
 

“Dancin’ like a Leprechaun” standing and seated version of a great Saint Patrick’s day music therapy idea

-Goal Area: receptive language, attention span, energy release, socialization

-Objective: Children will follow directions of lyrics. There are TWO versions here. One is a standing circle dance and the other a seated movement activity. Both are below.

-Materials: Song and children.  An area to perform a circle dance. Toy leprechaun (as a visual.)

-Method: Review each motion with the children. Sing and perform the motion one sentence at a time until all have joined in.  String the motions and sentences together and encourage all to move together.

-Adaptations: Perform one movement and ask the children to label the motion. Then, ask the children to tell you what comes next. This helps improve expressive language and sequencing/memory skills.  Once the children know the song, sing it increasingly  fast and quietr.   Experiment with loud, soft, fast and slow but be sure to end peacefully!

-Submitted by: Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes.

-Melody-Words and chords:

 

Tune: The Irish Wash woman http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eS3J-rHpuag

Seated version:

Clapping like a leprechaun.  Round and around and around and on.

Tap your knees and give a squeeze. The leprechaun is going to sneeze!

aaaaahhhchoooo! ( This activity is a lot of stimulation. I usually repeat it several times going faster and quieter each time. I also ask the kids what comes next. And they always know!)

————————————————–

Jumpin’ like a leprechaun around and around and around and on.

Slide your feet and point your toe. St. Patrick’s day is near (here) you know.

Hands held high. Hand held low. Hands in the middle and round you go.

Let go of hands and site on the floor. Quiet down as you were before.

(1 2 3 4. 1 2 3 4. 1 2 3 4 stand up as you were before. )

 

 

 

Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

 

 

“His Name is Fred” Saint Patrick’s day music therapy activity idea for children

-Goal Area: Memory/sequencing, motor skills, concept of spacial relationships (prepositions)  and receptive language.

-Objective: Kids move along the the lyrics and help describe their motions (expressive language.)

-Materials: a puppet or picture of a leprechaun.

-Method: The therapist first demonstrates the motion without the song and elicits participation of the group.  Then he/she incorporates the lyrics and melody.  The children are encouraged to move along AND to help remember and describe the motions.  Pictures can help with this.

Adaptations: Think of your own silly ways to move.

-Submitted by: Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes.

Tune: 6 little ducks went out to play

1. There’s a leprechaun. His name is Fred. With pointy ears on the side of his head.

Side of his head, (on sol)

his name is (mi)

Fred.  (do)

2. With one foot up and one foot down, his swings his hips around and around.

Feet up and down. Hips round and round.

Side of his head, his name is Fred.

3. His arms; they stick out far and wide. He wags his head from side to side.

Arms out wide. Side to side.

Up and down. Round and round.

Side of his head, his name is Fred.

4. He stops to put his puppy dog rover. And he finds a four leaf lucky clover.  Puppy Rover. 4 leaf clover.  Arms out wide. Side to side. Up and down. Round and round. Side of his head, his name is Fred.

5. He crossed his arms that silly old elf. He gave a squeeze and he hugged himself.  Hugged himself. Silly old elf.  Puppy Rover. 4 leaf clover.  Arms out wide. Side to side. Up and down. Round and round. Side of his head, his name is Fred.

6. That’s the end there is no more.  Close eyes, now yawn, sleep and snore!

 

“The Leprechaun Clown” Saint Patrick’s day Dance; a music therapy idea

Closely based on the Elf Clown by Susan Olson Higgins. 
 
Stand in a circle
Hold hands tight. Begin to walk to the right. (Pause.)
 
Now you leprechauns, spin around. 
Slap your knees and tough the ground.
Jump up tall and tap your toe. Tap it fast (pause) and tap it slow (pause.)
Wiggle your fingers and reach for the sky.
Clap your hands way up high.
 
All you Leprechauns, sit right down. 
And go to sleep you leprechaun clown!
 
Please send in any activities or musical processes  that you use with children, adolescents or adults of all ages and abilities. These could be activities for use for kids, adolescents or adults that have autism, adhd, add, down’s / down syndrome, speech language delays, oral-motor issues, physical disabilities, mental health issues, conduct disorder, cerebral palsy and other issues that we human have to contend with.  I’m also interested in any activities for people dealing with health issues, dementia, Alzheimer’s, chemical dependency, other addictions, grief, cancer, pain management and any other life issue.  I have just installed a “spam” locator which means that I’ll actually get the mail as mail. Please email me at margie@musictherapytunes.com and put activity in the subject line. Give yourself (or the author/composer)  all the credit you want or remain anonymous. Thank you!! – Margie La Bella at music therapy tunes

“John the Leprechaun” St. Patrick’s Day music therapy idea for kids

Goal Area: Receptive and Expressive language
Objective: Children will vocalize during the chorus and discuss the absurdities in the lyrics.
Materials: The Leprechaun adapted from the verses of “Old Dan Tucker”  (Check out the melody on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEQshqLxTss 
Method: Sing. Discuss.
Adaptations: (optional) If March 17 is not near, then change the name to anything you want. Have the children write new lyrics with their own absurdities. Have pictures available.
The chorus is good for oro-motor skills and vocalization and the verses for language.
Submitted by: (optional name and email) Margie La Bella of musictherapytunes.com
Lyrics,chords, music, solfege…:

C                  G            C
Chorus: Ya, ha, hah. Eyo, ho, ho. (repeat)
mi sol sol      mi    re    do
C                     F            C                                      G               C
Verses 1. John, John the leprechaun. Went to school with one shoe on. (to chorus.)
1. He went to bed in a coffee can. He washed his face in a frying pan.
2. He combed his hair with a wheel. He got a headache in his heel.
3. He took a bath in a lake. He brushed this teeth with a rake.
4. He wore his socks on his head. He washed his clothes in his bed.
5. He played outside on a chair. He washed the table with his hair.

“Yummy -O” Thanksgiving Turkey song for music therapy / education with kids

 
Age: 0 to 5 and older
Goal Area: Listening skills, Thanksgiving
Name of Activity: Yummy Yummy-O
Objective: Kids follow implied directions of song lyrics, and sing/vocalize “Yummy, oh” or other applicable sound that would be beneficial. 
Materials: song and kids
Submitted by: Margie@musictherapytunes.com
Tune: Old McDonald
Source: Yummy-O by Dr. Thomas Moore on his “Sing a Song of Holidays CD.”
C                         F           C
Turkey time is here again, 
C                G         C
Yummy Yummy-O 
C                         F           C
The turkeys all are in the pen, 
C                G         C
Yummy Yummy-O 

With a gobble-gobble here 
             F
And a gobble-gobble there; 
C                           F
Here a gobble, there a gobble 
C                         F
Everywhere a gobble-gobble. 
C                          F        C
Turkey time is here again, 
C              G            C
Yummy Yummy-O
They gobble, gobble when they talk,
Yummy Yummy-O
They strut so proudly when they walk,
Yummy Yummy-O
With a strut-strut here, etc.
(repeat gobble gobble sounds)
Turkey time is here again,
Yummy Yummy-OTheir chins are red, their necks are long,
Yummy Yummy-O
And soon they’ll sing another song,
Yummy Yummy-O
With a squawk-squawk here, etc.

(repeat strut and gobble sounds)
Turkey time is here again,
Yummy Yummy-O