Winter Clothing Song for kids

-Age: 1-7

-Goal Area:  expressive and receptive language

-Objective: Children point to related body parts, pictures, clothing items and/or fill in the musical pause with the correct word (clothing item.)

-Materials: song, kids, props

-Method: sing, point, and do. I use a picture of a snowman wearing the various clothing items.

-Tune: Baby, it’s cold outside.

-Submitted by: Margie La Bella of music therapy tunes.

-Words, chords, and uses/benefits are featured on the following video. My videos can be looked up on youtube and are also on the VIDEO page of this website! Check them out and enjoy.  http://youtu.be/OUcqCiMwyAo

How to use this site: LYRICS pages – Polar Bear Winter song for preschool, kindergarten children / kids.

Hi! This is just a good opportunity to show you that there are some great lesson ideas incorporated in the Lyrics Pages. This particular song is under the lyrics for the Move CD. Just as it. Each song has lyrics, chords, and benefits/learning objectives.  These are usually listed after the song. The VIDEO link ( so you can hear the melody) is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biH48n5-qzY
Benefits:This song helps with listening and pretending skills, both needed for cognitive development.Other uses:    It also stimulates attention (to the movements of the mother and baby bears,)
 as well as auditory anticipation and vocalization of “Grrowl!” The repetitive “growl,                                                                growl, stomp!) gives a sense of sequencing and energy/vocal release.
 
5. GROWL, GROWL, STOMP
 
        Dm                                               Gm     Dm        A7
The polar bear looks for her cubs with a growl, growl, stomp.
     Gm       A7        Dm
The polar bear looks for her cubs with a growl, growl, and a stomp.
     Gm                              Dm                                                     A7
She (they) breaks the ice, and catches a fish, and holds it in her paws.
Dm
She (they) eat it up, and goes to sleep in the land on Santa Claus.
 
 The baby bears roll in the snow with a growl, growl, stomp.
 The baby bears roll in the snow with a growl, growl, and a stomp. 
The polar bears throw the snow with a growl, growl, stomp. 
The polar bears slide down the ice with a growl, growl, stomp.
 
Benefits:This song helps with listening and pretending skills, both needed for cognitive development.Other uses:    It also stimulates attention (to the movements of the mother and baby bears,)
 as well as auditory anticipation and vocalization of “Grrowl!” The repetitive “growl,                                                                growl, stomp!) gives a sense of sequencing and energy/vocal release.

“Speechy Hot Potato” music & speech therapy activity

-Age: 0-5 and up
-Goal Area: Language and auditory processing
-Name of Activity: Hot Potato
-Objective: Children take turns being it: answering questions and playing the xylophone
-Materials: prepared questions appropriate for group, xylophone
-Method: Play a song meaningful to the group, and have the children pass a maraca around the circle.  When the music stops, the child holding the maraca must answer a question.  Invite the speech therapist into this process if you can.  (If the group is non-verbal, have the child follow a direction.)  That child then goes to the center of the circle and plays the xylophone while the process is repeated.  Continue until everyone has had a turn answering questions and playing the xylophone.
-Submitted by: (optional name and email)  Margie@musictherapytunes.com
Sing to any age-appropriate song.  An non-fascinating example is as follows:
Tune: Wheels on the Bus, or any other kid song. As you see the words are easy to adapt.
Lyrics:
C                                                                    G                       C
Shake the maraca and pass it down. Pass it down. Pass it down.
 
Shake the maraca and pass it down.
G                         C
Until the music stops.

“The Turtle Song” music therapy song for toddlers and preschoolers

-Realm: Music for Speech therapy songs / aims.
-Age: 0 to 5 plus
-Goal Area: Expressive language
-Name of Activity: You can’t make a turtle come out.
-Objective: To elicit language
-Materials: A puppet turtle works wonders. I pair this with the following song often.
-Method: Crunch puppet together to simulate a turtle. Have the children shout “come out!” several times to coax  the shy turtle.  How long can they stretch their sentences.  Sometimes I even get  “Come out of your shell right now!”  But, he only comes out when he hears the word “please?” You can work out a whole routine. Ask the children their names, or to say hello. This is a great motivator for eliciting exp. Language.
-Adaptations: (optional) 
-Submitted by: (optional name and email)  Margie@musictherapytunes.com
Melody: Popeye the sailor man
Chords:           C                      F                  C              
Lyrics:  You can’t make a turtle come out. 
            F                   G                    C
You can’t make a turtle come out.
                                F                                    C                                                                     
            You can shake him all over or tickle or shout, 
                C                        G7                 C      G7      C
but you can’t make a turtle come out.  Come out!!

“Letters in the Air” pre-writing activity for special education lessons plans

-Age: 6-12
-Goal Area: cognitive
-Name of Activity: Letters in the air
-Objective: Children will either make pre-letter shapes in the air or actual letters.
-Materials: props (see adaptations) children’s recorded song that offers a karaoke version, or familiar instrumental music.
-Method: Come up with a movement or sequence of movements to do during the chorus and make letter shapes during the verses. Sing/chant
what you’re doing. Pre-letter shapes can include: horizontal lines, vertical lines, dots, circles, “bounces,” curves, criss-crosses, and more. (Ask the OT or classroom teacher.)
-Adaptations: Use maracas or scarves. Use this activity to help the children so as to improve their skills such as crossing midline, following a shape, moving weaker muscles, following patterns and more. Again – ask the teacher or therapist what the kid’s needs are.
Submitted by: (optional name and email) Margielessonplans@gmail.com

“Going over the Sea” teaches preposition concepts: music therapy / educational songs for young children

-Age: 3 to 5 and older
-Goal Area: Cognitive (numbers and preposition/spacial relationships, also attention span)
-Name of Activity: Going over the Sea
-Objective: Students review numbers, and concepts of over, under, backwards, forward
-Materials: Song “Going over the Sea”
-Method: Sing song and act out the chorus.  Motions: show finger numbers. Act out the activity.  While seated, “jump” with your feet, then put your hands together like a boat, then give a salute. For the chorus, place both hands in the specified position.
-Adaptations: Draw  or get simple pictures of each verse. Make up your own verses. Do with different volumes, speeds, or emotions. 
-Submitted by: (optional name and email) Margie@musictherapytunes.com
Lyrics,chords, solfege, melody used: Make up your own or use this one:   http://youtu.be/1Oks00L4maY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
 G          C                                                            G7                             C
When    I     was   one   I     ate   a    bun   going    over     the   sea. 
G    C                                                                    G7                      C        
I   jumped  aboard a sailing ship and  the captain said to me.
  
                         C                                                                                                                                                                G         C     
Chorus: Going over, going under, (going backward, going forward.) Stand at attention like a soldier with a    1, 2,  3!”
    
2. When I was two I played with glue -going over the sea. I jumped aboard a sailing ship and the captain said to me,
3. When I was three I hugged a tree. -going over the sea. I jumped aboard a sailing ship and the captain said to me,
4. When I was four I knocked at the door -going over the sea. I jumped aboard a sailing ship and the captain said to me,
5. When I was five I learned to dive -going over the sea. I jumped aboard a sailing ship and the captain said to me,
When I was six I learned to mix -going over the sea. I jumped aboard a sailing ship and the 
 
 
 
 

“The Snowball” silly lyric comprehension song for children (and a little science.)

-Age: 6-12 and younger
-Goal: To improve auditory comprehension
-Name of Activity: The Snowball
-Materials: song
-Method: Sing and do motions.  Discuss what really happened here.  Talk about ice melting and more.
-Submitted by: Margie@musictherapytunes.com
-Source: unknown (another poem I collected before the internet began…..)
-Melody: Verse of “I’m getting’ nuttin’ for Christmas,” or “Clemintine.”
Words:
   C                          F        C                         G              C
I made myself a snowball as perfect as could be.
   C                                 F        C                   G                 C     
I thought I’d keep it as a pet and let it sleep with me.
                                 F                       G                      C
I made it some pajamas and a pillow for it’s head. 
C                                D7                    G                       C
Then last night it ran away, but first it wet the bed. 

“Teaching Letters” literacy activity for music therapy / education with young children

-Age: 3-10
-Goal Area: academics : connecting a letter with a sound, first letter sound of a given name, learning names of classmates.
-Name of Activity: “If your name begins with the letter I sing”  as in Nocera’s book  song title is “Letters and Names”
-Objective: child stands when the first letter of his/her name is sung and follows the one-step direction.
-Materials:“If your name begins with the letter I sing”  as in Nocera’s “Letters and Names”
-Method: Sing the song to one child in the group at a time.
-Adaptations: (optional) Use to teach the connection between letter names and letter sounds.  Have the children use various cognitive abilities. Use to teach colors, numbers, group similarities and differences, birthdays addresses,  whatever.   More than one child may stand in these cases.  Work anything you need into the lyrics. Vary the accompaniment at level and age dictate.  It might look like this “If you’re a boy with a square block jump up and down….. jump and take a bow.”
-Submitted by: (optional name and email) Margielessonplans@gmail.com
-Lyrics,chords, solfege, melody used:
 
(A7)        D                                        G        D                                                      A       
If your   name begins  with the letter  M,   stand up. (rest rest)            Stand  up (rest rest)
So sol     do      do do   do   do   do do do   fa       mi                                    do       re.  
 
                    D                                         G        D                   D             A            D
If your       name begins with the    letter   M,    stand up and take a    bow.
So sol        do      do do   do   do      do do do      fa       mi  do    re     ti      do       

“I had a little Froggie” music therapy song for kids teaches absurdities (language skill.)

-Age:  6-12-
-Goal Area: Language  (correction of absurdities.)
-Name of Activity: Tiny Tim
-Objective: Children will correct the impossibilities mentioned in the song lyrics.
-Materials: Kids. Song.
-Method: Sing. Discuss what’s silly with the song.  Discuss healthy things to eat and drink, and hygene.
-Adaptations: Write you own silly song about a pet.  To stimulate vocalization, make all the sound effects the song suggests. 
-Submitted by: (optional name and email)  Margie La Bella
-Melody: Miss Lucy had a baby/steamboat
-Lyrics: 
.D………………………Em…………..A
I had a little turtle. His name was tiny Tim.
    A                                                                      D
I put him in the bathtub to see if he could swim.
              D…………………………Em
He drank up all the water. He ate up all the soap.
……………A7                                                              D
And he burped last night from a bubble in his throat.

“What’s Missing Here” cognitive music therapy lesson plan for preschoolers and young children

-Goal Area: cognitive (and language)
-Objective: Children look at a picture and tell the therapist what is wrong with it.
-Materials: Prepared pictures of a familiar object with a piece missing
-Method: Show picture and discuss.
-Adaptations:  1.You can add something that doesn’t belong and have the kids identify it, like a monkey with a hair-do. 
                      2. Or you can also change/mix up a characteristic….. like bike wheels on a train.
                      3. You could even discuss how to fix the issue or adapt to it.  (The boy’s ice cream cone fell down. He could ask for another.)
-Submitted by: (optional name and email) Margie@ musictherapytunes.com
-Tune: the teacher’s part of Harry Chapin’s “Flowers are Red” then the child’s part for the student’s responses.   See youtube for melody .  – or Jimmy Crack Corn (Here’s the Jimmy.lyrics:  Oh no what happened here? Oh no who can see? Oh no what happened here? Who can tell me? Then incorporate the children’s answer into the farmer in the dell melody. …The horse has no tail…the horse has no tail…)  Or, pick your own melody.
                            
   A          E             A              E           A        E            A            
  What’s missing here, oh no! What’s missing here?                      
 A                    D      A            D          A                         E            A
What can it be– who can see.? Oh no what’s missing here?
(question)
                             A              D      A        D                          A     D            A    E                
(response)       I see this bike has no wheel.  The bike has no wheel. 
  A           D                   A         D               A       E           A
That is just what (name*) saw. The bike has no wheel.
                                                                                                    (Adjust this line for the needs/size of the group)