MOVE! (Full Digital Album)

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MOVE! (Full Digital Album)
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  • Description

MOVE: Music therapist and special educator Margie La Bella’s “Move” CD focuses on the receptive language skills needed to understand and follow directions.   Each song fosters concept development through active movement and dance. Skills addresses include: single and multi-step directions, body parts, opposites, verbs, prepositions, creative problem solving and more.

1.Everybody Wave Hello

This song opens our time together and sets the stage for upcoming learning. Children can the the opportunity to follow three one-step directions,while reaching out to connect with other people.

2. Doin’ the Robot Dance

To improve auditory processing skills (listening and following directions.)The rapid-fire lyrics command attention and help children to learn the wordsassociated with ways of specific body parts. Older children can move to the beat.

3. Move and Stop

Younger children can simply follow the one-step directions.Children relate body parts with an associated motion.This song is also good for improving auditory attention skills, and motor/impulse control. Older children can perform the last line (three 1-step directions in rapid   sequence).

4. Stand up, Sit Back Down

To provide a positive outlet for a natural action of children, (to leave their seat.) To foster learning of body parts and ways to move them. Children move specified body parts as suggested by song.Children move in creative ways within the confines suggested by lyric.

5. Growl, Growl, Stomp

This song helps with listening and pretending skills, both needed for cognitive development.

It also stimulates attention (to the movements of the mother and baby bears,)as well as auditory anticipation and vocalization of “Grrowl!” The repetitive “growl, growl, stomp! gives a sense of sequencing and energy/vocal release.

6. The Yee-haw Song

This song requires receptive understanding of body parts and associated movements, as well  as

expressive use of the word “Yeehaw!”Children can simulate the galloping sound of a horse by tapping

their knees during the chorus, or by pretending to ride a horse like a cowboy. Older children can

perform the directive twice and sing “yeehaw!”

7.  Multi-Step Blues

To improve ability to follow a (long) string  of quick one-step directions and control one’s actions

body vocabulary and associated verbs, attention, backward sequencing of   directions, motor control and outlet for energy.

8. Opposite Blues

Helps facilitate the understanding of each concept individually (tall, small,   happy, sad, lift, arms, up, flutter, down, fast, slow, squeeze, and relax) and in contrast to it’s opposite.

Other benefits: body vocabulary and associated verbs, attention, backward sequencing of                                      directions, motor control and outlet for energy.

9. The Caterpillar

To stimulate pretending and other higher process thinking skills. To foster focus, bodily relaxation and the concept of slow. To teach about how a caterpillar turns into a butterfly.  Sometimes our lives can do the same. Making dreams come true.

10 .  Move it by your Chair

Aids in experiential learning of the concepts: in front of, behind, on the side,

over, and under. The children learn about spacial relationships (prepositions) and counting while dancing freely to a lively beat. You may want to pause the CD after each direction is sung, help the children to the correct location, and then resume the music and dancing. The children can relax and listen to the fading drum beats at the end of the song.

11. One Step Blues

This song provides a deal of time to process the meaning of verbs and related body parts.

Children can carry out the one part direction to the timing of the related sound effects. This is good for auditory attending and memory.

12. Thinking Song -version one:

To help teach body parts and simple problem solving.

Older children can pretend to rock a baby each time they hear the words“baby”, and “honey.” They can also alternate or switch sides of the body each time a direction is given within a verse, as this is good for integrating sides of the brain.

13. Stand Up, Sit Down (version 2)

The directions to the song are easier to understand and less the accompaniment is less distracting.

14. Thinking Song -level two

This song fosters listening and creative problem-solving. It requires knowledge of body parts and quick deciphering skills. Older children can pretend to rock a baby each time they hear the words“baby”, and “honey.” They can also alternate or switch sides of the body each time a direction is given within a verse, as this is good for integrating sides of the brain.

15. Growl, Growl, Stomp (instrumental version.)

Just nice to listen or sing along to.

16. Music time is Over

           This peacefully ends the listening time.This song naturally lends itself to swaying, rocking, and holding hands. Everyone can end on a positive, social, successful, relaxing note.

 

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